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Visiting Amazon’s One & Only Bookstore

20160828_130719_001-1While in Seattle recently, I visited Amazon’s flagship, first-ever, and currently only brick-and-mortar bookstore. I was curious why Amazon – the king of online book sales – had changed its marketing strategy. Why invest in a traditional bookstore now after so many years of clobbering the competition by offering a broad selection at discount prices? What made this bookstore different from any other? And why build it in Seattle?

20160828_121536At first glance, Amazon’s sparkling new bookstore looks much like any other. The perimeter of the store is rimmed with tall windows, flooding the interior with natural light. Tall bookcases line the floor, mostly fiction on one side of the store, non-fiction on the other. There’s a children’s section at the rear with cozy seats for young shoppers.

But browse further and you’ll notice a few differences.

20160828_124651 Book covers face outward. You won’t find any books filed with just spines showing. According toa sales manager I questioned, it was to “encourage the discovery process”.

20160828_130251New products are front and center, and you are encouraged to give them a try.

20160828_121619For the most part, only books that receive a 4 to 5 star rating on Amazon.com are stocked in the store. Cards positioned below each title provide a sample review and the book’s star rating on Amazon.com.

20160828_122019Actual prices are not noted on the covers or on the cards below them, but scanners are available throughout the store and you are encouraged to use them.

20160828_122003Prices are the same as the discounted prices on Amazon.com. This book by Erik Larson, one of my favourite authors, was listed at $17.00 . The discounted price was $11.70. Shoppers at the store gain by avoiding shipping costs and any mailing delays.

Displays throughout the store reinforce the Amazon.com connection. Online reviewers determine not only what books are stocked, but also to some degree where their favourite books are shelved and located.

If the crowds sifting through the store on the day I visited are any indication, Amazon’s just might be on to something with its new store. Certainly some – like me – were just curious visitors, but since I walked out with 3 newly purchased books when I had no intention of buying even one, perhaps that’s a testimony to Amazon’s clever marketing. As a reader, I felt strangely empowered. Here I belonged to a worldwide community of readers where our reviews, our feedback, our choices determined what was placed on the shelves. And talk about enticing prices. The discounts are hard to beat.

According to the sales clerk I questioned, this is exactly what why Amazon ventured into the brick-and-mortar field. “Amazon has been in operation for 20 years. We felt it was time to branch out, to offer more to our valued customers.”

Two more Amazon stores are set to open in the next few months – one in Portland, the other in San Diego. But why Seattle for the first? Perhaps a better question is ‘Why not Seattle?” Seattle is Amazon’s home base and at 20,000 employees in 30 buildings spread throughout the city, its largest private employer.  Seattle is where the company started, where it’s grown into a worldwide mega-empire, and where proof of it gigantic holdings can be seen in a new office complex currently under construction that will soon dominate the city’s downtown.

Behind the Scenes at a Press Run

Before ‘Dinosaurs’ of the Deep was in its current hardcover form, I scored a thrill by watching the book roll off the presses at the Friesens plant in Altona, Manitoba.

The Friesen plant is a huge place.
The Friesens plant is a huge place.
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Stacks of paper…stacks of covers…. all set to go

I had never seen this end of the publishing operation before, and I was amazed at the complexity of the process. Then again the pros at Friesens made it all seem easy.

The Man Roland machine cranks out full panels at an amazing rate. Check out the video below...memorizing!
The Man Roland machine cranks out full panels at an amazing rate. Check out the video below…memorizing!
One panel = 24 pages on one side
One side from a sheet off the Man Roland equals 24 pages in the book or 48 pages when you count the 24 pages printed on the back sideI

Each panel is checked for colour and accuracy, and then signed off by the publisher before the run continues.

Turnstone's publisher Jamis Paulson signs the first panel giving approval for the run to continue.
Turnstone’s publisher, Jamis Paulson, signs the first panel giving approval for the run to continue.
Now we're good to go!
Now we’re good to go!

The cover looks amazing, thanks to the vivid illustration by Julius Cstonyi, a world renowned paleoartist.

Aaron, our Friesen guide, discusses the finer points of the cover with Jamis Paulson, Turnstone's publisher.
Aaron, our Friesens’ guide, discusses the finer points of the cover with Jamis.
One side from a sheet off the Manover machine equals 24 pages in the book or 48 pages when you count the 24 pages printed on the back side.
I get to sign off on the cover, too.

DSC08814(1)-1There’s something to see at every turn in the plant.  Here’s the trimmer.  It slices through a stack of pages like a knife going through butter.  Watch your fingers!

What a great day this was!

DSC08831-1

5 Weird Weather Bonanzas

A hotter than average summer brought an unexpected discovery recently. In the melt of a retreating glacier, Italian officials found the remains of 24 year-old Canadian Gregory Barnes who had gone missing in 1980 while skiing in the Italian and Swiss Alps.

For his family who had wondered about his fate, this brought long overdue closure.  For me, it was a reminder that strange, beyond-our-control circumstances have often been sources of unexpected discoveries.  Here are 5 accidental finds that owe their existence not so much to normal logic as they do to unpredictable weather conditions.

1974 – Ethiopia, Africa

When paleoanthropologist Donald Johanson awoke on the morning of November 30, 1974, he had a hunch “something terrific might happen.”  In a region he’d searched before, he walked along a gully recently created by a flash flood.  Among the churned stones and debris, he spotted a fossilized arm bone and several other bone fragments, all of them human-like and very old. They proved to be the remains of an adult female who lived millions of years ago.  Named Lucy after a popular Beatles song, it was the oldest and most complete human discovered up until that time.

1986 – Sea of Galilee, Israel

After a severe drought, the water level in the Sea of Galilee dropped, exposing areas of sea floor never seen before.  Two brothers, Yuval and Moshe Lufan, spotted a murky outline in the mud along that shoreline.  It turned out to be a fishing boat built 2000 years ago that had been preserved in the mud. Composed of twelve different kinds of wood, including sycamore, laurel, oak and cedar, the  vessel matched descriptions of fishing vessels given in the Bible, and was likely the kind of craft used to sail the sea during the time of Jesus.

1991 – Italian Alps

Following a summer of unusual heat, two German hikers – Helmut Simon and his wife, Erika- discovered a body embedded in a slowly melting glacier. Thinking it was an unfortunate hiker who had slipped and fallen to his death, Helmut took a photo of the body before continuing down the mountain to alert authorities. What the Simon’s found instead was a 5000 year old mummy, one of the oldest and best preserved ever discovered.  Nicknamed Otzi the Iceman, the mummy is now on display in the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, Italy.

 

1994 – St. Lawrence River

After a strong storm swept through the area near his cottage along the St Lawrence River, Marc Tremblay spotted pots, rifles, axes, bottles and the timbers of a ship half-buried in the sand.  Called to investigate, archaeologists discovered the wreck of the Elizabeth and Mary, one of 32 English ships that led an attack on Quebec City in 1690 and then sank in a wild storm while making a hasty retreat.

 

 

2004 – Florida
After Hurricane Jeanne slammed the Atlantic coast, scraping away sand and relocating dunes, archaeologist Joel Ruth used a metal detector to comb the shoreline. He spotted a Spanish silver coin on the beach.  “I grabbed it and then every foot it was – bam, bam – another hit,” he reported.  After 4 hours of searching, the batteries of his metal detector died, but not before Ruth had found more than 180 silver coins worth more than $40,000.

 

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