Reading and Writing with Rae

Over the holiday period, my son and his family from Seattle stayed with us. It was relaxed visit and fortunately the weather was mild enough that we could enjoy winter activities. Because they live in a region where snow is a rarity, our six-year-old granddaughter, Raeghan, was thrilled. She made snow angels, skated at the Forks, tobogganed down hills, built a snowman, and tossed snowballs at her parents.

Long ago, when Rae was just beginning to speak, she started calling me Bumpa. I think she was aiming for ‘Grandpa’, but came out with Bumpa instead. The name stuck. Bumpa I became and Bumpa I still am to her. (Later, we discovered that Rae was on to something. My parents immigrated from Belgium and in Flemish, grandfather is Bompa so Rae’s ‘Bumpa’ is perfect!)

Reading to Rae, 2015

Rae is in grade 1. Her parents – both book lovers – have been reading to her since she was only a few months old, and they’ve passed on their love of books and stories to their daughter. Rae loves all kinds of books – fiction and non-fiction – and with each visit, I see remarkable changes in her reading abilities. She uses many strategies to decode words and has a never-give-up attitude that carries her through difficult passages.

On this visit, Rae wanted to write her own book. She started by telling the story of How the Unicorn Meets the Wolf  to her dad. He created a storyboard with panels representing each page of the book. They folded paper to make a booklet, and Rae began to transpose the story she’d created, allowing room for illustrations that she would complete later.

Rae’s story had all the elements: a main character – Winter, the unicorn; a secondary character – the wolf; conflict, rising action, climax and resolution.  There were touches of drama and adventure, and even humour.

When I showed her that we could create her book on the computer, Rae quickly shifted gears. Using Publisher, we shared the experience of typing out the words. It was slow going for Rae who hunted and pecked out the letters, but she giggled often and loved seeing her creation come to life. I showed her how to capitalize letters, add punctuation to sentences, insert quotations for dialogue, shift between lines and use other tools of the writing trade.

The whole process of putting words on the pages took several hours. Later Rae spent more time illustrating her story. The end result was a book she could call her own, and a satisfying experience for the 3 generations of contributors to the project – Rae, Dad and Bumpa.

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