Tweaking & Critiquing

LUM3N / Pixabay

With Coop the Great heading to print, it’s time to take stock of a few things that steered me to a successful conclusion.  Not everything I’ve written has ended this well.  I can show you filing cabinets filled with bits and pieces that never made it to print. 

In the case of Coop the Great, I owe much to a writer’s group I belong to called The Anita Factor. All of us in this small group are  passionate about writing for children and young adults, so we are pretty focused when we meet. Meetings are held every two weeks. Whoever can make it shows up, so the arrangement is flexible and works well for those who travel or have other commitments.  Typically, anywhere from 3 to 6 people read their work at the meeting. It could be a chapter from a work-in-progress novel, the manuscript for a picture book, a short story, even occasionally a query letter to be sent to a publisher. After each reading, we take turns discussing the work.

After I’d written the first ten chapters of Coop the Great, I read the prologue and first chapter to the group. I thought it was a pretty solid stuff, but even though the others seemed to like the concept, they offered suggestions and asked probing questions that got me thinking.

ShekuSheriff / Pixabay

One of my colleagues pointed out that dogs rely on their sense of smell more than sight, and suggested I tweak a section with that in mind. Someone else wondered if the vocabulary was a bit beyond my target group of 9-12-year olds. Another pointed out that since Coop was a very small dog, he’d be viewing life from a very different perspective than a larger dog. Another asked whether Coop was a young dog, then pointed out that if he was, a few details in the story would have to change.

I realized from these comments and questions that there were gaps in my story. If I wanted readers to buy into the concept of a dog as a narrator, then I needed to enhance the doggy details. I hadn’t really given a lot of thought to Coop’s age until then either. I’d written these chapters assuming he was a mid-life dog, but realized now that if I made him an old dog, the story would have more impact.

 

geralt / Pixabay

The feedback was helpful. Although I thought I’d nailed Coop’s voice, I realized that I hadn’t developed his character as well as I should. I didn’t know him or his history. Before going on, I needed to give more thought to who Coop was, how he viewed life and how his past influenced his present situation.

As the creator of the work, I determine what suggestions to incorporate, but having alternate viewpoints from other writers can pay off big time.  In the case of Coop the Great, they certainly did.

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